peony haiku


wearing morning dew

the peonies genuflect

one pink and one white

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March – a poem


image from http://www.itsnotworkitsgardening.com/2010_12_01_archive.html

March

Today is not Spring —
trees blackly dozing,
birds few and reticent.

and today is not Spring —
daffodils stretching their legs
before pulling on their yellow hats.

and today is not Spring —
spring peepers still tuning up
for their choral symphony.

Yet, as I wake with the early sun
rising over a field speckled green,
I think, “Maybe not Spring, but it’s not Winter.”




— David Smashey 3/4/2012




April — William Carlos Williams

sumac2

April

If you had come away with me
into another state
we had been quiet together.
But there the sun coming up
out of the nothing beyond the lake was
too low in the sky,
there was too great a pushing
against him,
too much of sumac buds, pink
in the head
with the clear gum upon them,
too many opening hearts of lilac leaves,
too many, too many swollen
limp poplar tassels on the
bare branches!
It was too strong in the air.
I had no rest against that
springtime!
The pounding of the hoofs on the
raw sods
stayed with me half through the night.
I awoke smiling but tired.


William Carlos Williams

The First Green of Spring — a poem by David Budbill

The First Green of Spring

Out walking in the swamp picking cowslip, marsh marigold,
this sweet first green of spring. Now sautéed in a pan melting
to a deeper green than they ever were alive, this green, this life,

harbinger of things to come. Now we sit at the table munching
on this message from the dawn which says we and the world
are alive again today, and this is the world’s birthday. And

even though we know we are growing old, we are dying, we
will never be young again, we also know we’re still right here
now, today, and, my oh my! don’t these greens taste good.

— David Budbill

tree peonies — spring beauties


My mom has beautiful flowers from early spring until the first hard freeze in the fall. Right now, the tree peonies (Paeonia suffruticosa) are blooming. If you’ve never seen tree peonies before, they’re like regular peonies on steroids — bigger (the white flower above is about 9-10 inches across), more elaborate, more expensive, more everything. Their unparalleled beauty this time of year makes the tree pollen’s annual attack on my immune system worth it.